‘Hungry for Change’

Okay. So it’s about time. And I’m just gonna come out and say it.

I’m offically a foodie. An organic buying, locally grown supporting, ideologically committed foodist. It’s not just something I like. It is crucial to me. The soft drink aisle has been dead to me for longer than I remember, and my food shelves are filled with a range of organic grains and seeds. I’m happy this way.

I suspect this will come as no great revelation to anyone except myself; similar to when I came home from Morocco and solemnly announced to my mother that I am a vegetarian- she rolled her eyes. My mother had been carefully coercing me into more mainstream animal consuming behaviour for the 21 years that I was in the closet.

Today, I ticked off an entry of my post-university to-do list. I watched Food Inc. And I kid you not, I cried. Tears of compassion, but also relief. First hand reporting of real-life experiences is what I require, as heart-wrenching as it can be. Things are the way they are because everyone is doing their best within a system that is inherently flawed. The people working within the system wish for change as well. And it is possible.

Here are some of my favourite quotes:

‘A culture that just views a pig as a pile of protoplasmic inanimate structure to be maniuplated by whatever creative design the human can foist on that critter, will probably view individuals within it’s community and other cultures in the community of nations with the same type of disdain, disrespect and controlling type mentality’.

‘Is cheapness everything that there is? [Work goes into] creating the mystique of cheap food.. when actually, it’s very expensive food. When you add up the environmental cost, societal costs, health costs… the industrial food is not honest food. It’s not priced honestly, it’s not produced honestly, it’s not processed honestly’.

‘To eat well in this country [America] costs more than to eat badly. It will take more money, and some people simply don’t have it. That’s why we need changes at the policy level, so that the carrots are a better deal then the chips’.

‘Imagine what it would be if as a national policy we said we are only successful if we have fewer people going to the hospital next than last year. The idea then would be to have such nutritionally unadulterated dense foods, that the people who ate it actually felt better, have more energy and weren’t sick as much. That’s a noble goal’.

‘You have to understand that we farmers are going to deliver to the marketplace what the marketplace demands. People have to start demanding good, wholesome food of us. And we’ll deliver. We’re very ingenius people, we’ll deliver’.

I didn’t think it was possible for me to feel this way about one American, let alone three… but I have so much love and adoration for these beautiful, smart men. I want to hug them.

If you are even remotely curious about why the world is the way it is, do yourself a favour and check this out. I am not sure there are many other things that could be considered as important.

www.foodincmovie.com

I am very curious to find some information relevant to the legislation and farming practices here in Australia. No doubt as with many things, America in this instance serves as a warning for the smaller countries considering following in their massive, corporate footsteps.

God forbid.

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2 thoughts on “‘Hungry for Change’

  1. Oh my god, you are are fantastic writer Ange! Thoroughly enjoyed reading this article and am glad you are no longer in the closet!!

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